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Frantz Coe Elementary School

Academics

Academics at Frantz Coe

Learn more about Seattle Public Schools curriculum.

In 2016, Seattle Public Schools adopted English language arts instructional materials created by Center for the Collaborative Classroom for reading and writing instruction in grades K-5.

Collaborative Literacy is a comprehensive ELA curriculum designed to develop independent readers, writers, and critical thinkers. Comprising three components– Being a Reader, Making Meaning, and Being a Writer– Collaborative Literacy addresses the core competencies traditionally taught in the language arts block while at the same time creating classroom communities in which students can learn and grow. The curriculum marries the latest research in literacy education with integrated social skills development and embedded professional learning.

Firmly rooted in best practices, Collaborative Literacy reflects the following principles throughout:

Learners become independent readers, writers, and thinkers: Students are invited to take risks in their learning, building their confidence and ability to express their thinking

Authentic reading and writing experiences: Students immediately apply what they are learning in whole-class instruction to their own reading and writing, reinforcing the new learning and showing students that what they are learning is relevant to their own lives

Equitable access: Lessons are carefully structured with whole-class and partner discussions to ensure that all students have ample opportunity to articulate their thinking

Professional learning: Lessons build teachers’ understanding of best practices in literacy instruction and give teachers the tools to transform classrooms

Meaningful assessments: Formative and summative assessments support instructional decision making for the class and for individual students

SEL with literacy instruction: Teachers foster fundamental shifts in the ways their students feel, speak, think, and learn, with the goal of enabling students to become independent learners

Having every student be a strong independent read is the goal of the staff at Coe Elementary. To this end, students and families also have the support of a reading specialists who provide intensive support to students in small groups settings.

The Health and Fitness Program/Curriculum at Coe School strives to share in the responsibility of developing positive intellectual, emotional and social skills of our students. Physical activity is proven to enhance intellectual learning and growth. In a success oriented environment, games and sports can enhance our students’ emotional and social skills. We learn about the differences between people, healthy competition, teamwork and sportsmanship. We learn about playing fair, winning with humility, losing with grace and respecting others. The students learn fitness concepts and health and nutrition concepts within the context of fun games. The ultimate goal is to provide a quality health and fitness program that builds knowledge, fitness, movement skills, social well being and confidence so all students can enjoy a healthy active lifestyle, and for students to develop a lifelong appreciation for physical activity and good nutrition.

A key component of the Health and Fitness curriculum is the understanding of five basic fitness components. They are cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance and body composition. All students learn about the five fitness components and actively engage in their practice. 3rd through 5th grade students are tested twice a year by running the Pacer, doing push-ups, doing curl-ups (sit-ups) and measuring the flexibility of the hamstrings and lower back. After the fall pre-test, students engage in goal-setting. The students are tested again in the spring to check for progress towards their goals.

Here is a brief description of the five fitness components.

Cardio-respiratory Endurance (tested by the Pacer, a timed 20 meter run)

Cardio-respiratory endurance is the ability of the heart and lungs to supply oxygen to the body during long periods of physical activity. Distance measurements such as the Pacer are used to determine the strength of the heart. Muscles demand oxygen to produce energy. The heart is the muscle that delivers oxygen to the rest of the body. During the Pacer, when a person slows down, it is because his/her muscles are not receiving enough oxygen from the heart and this determines the level of cardio-respiratory endurance.

Flexibility (tested by the v-sit and reach)

Flexibility is the muscles’ ability to move a joint through a full range of motion. It is important for reducing the risk of injury and enhancing performance in activities. A common way to measure flexibility is the sit and reach measurement. This measurement is done using a box designed to determine how far the body will stretch forward at the waist.

Muscular Endurance (tested by curl-ups)

Muscular endurance is the ability of the muscles to work over a long period of time without becoming tired. Being able to keep the muscles working without having to stop and rest is important for everyone. The one-minute curl-up measurement is used to determine the amount of muscular endurance in the abdominals and hips.

Muscular Strength (tested by push-ups)

Muscular strength is the ability of a muscle or muscles to push or pull with its total force. Strength is a part of every movement. The push-up is a measure of muscular strength. This measurement is done by performing as many right angle push-ups as possible. By improving muscular strength, every physical activity becomes easier.

Body Composition (not tested)

Body composition is the relationship between fat-free mass and fat mass. Fat-free mass is the combined weight of the bones, muscles and organs. Fat mass is the total weight of fat stored in the body. A healthy body is the correct relationship of fat-free mass and fat mass. Healthy body composition is maintained at approximately 80% fat free mass and 20% fat mass . Students come to understand that regular physical activity and good nutritional habits should accomplish a healthy body composition.

Seattle Public Schools is committed to providing a daily, quality Physical Education program that builds knowledge, fitness, movement skills, social well-being and confidence so all students can enjoy a healthy active lifestyle.

The program goals will be accomplished by:

Knowledge

  • A K-12 articulated written curriculum aligned with state standards (i.e. nutrition, goal setting, five components of fitness)

Physical Fitness

  • Progressive physical fitness skills articulated from K-12
  • Fitness measurements are used to track students? fitness
  • Implementation of personal fitness plans at middle and high school

Fundamental Movement Skills

  • Developmentally appropriate progressive motor skills K-12
  • Team, individual and lifetime activities that build the habit of an active lifestyle
  • Social Well-being
    • Improving social relationships, and emotional well-being through active engagement in physical activity

A new math resource was initiated fall 2014 in the Seattle Public Schools after the School Board approved Math in Focus.

Math in Focus, uses the Singapore method of teaching math, takes an approach called “bar modeling” as the primary strategy to visually depict problems. Students learn early how to draw these models, and they continue to use them to show their thinking as problems become more complex.

The District will use Math in Focus as one basis for aligning curriculum with Common Core State Standards, the new statewide benchmarks that also emphasize pictures and graphics to foster “number sense” in learning math. One commonality with Common Core is the program’s emphasis on skill mastery – providing a deep focus on one skill with repeated exposure, moving from concrete to pictorial to abstract.

The single adoption across the District helps improve equity – maintaining consistency for students who move from school to school and ensuring that students enter middle school equally prepared. The aligned program also helps with teacher collaboration and professional development. In addition to the Math In Focus materials, Coe teachers supplement using other materials to best meet the needs of learners.

The newly adoption Seattle Public Schools K-5 science curriculum is Amplify Science. It is the product of a collaboration between the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science and the instructional technologists at Amplify, with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the National Science Foundation.

Since their release in 2013, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have raised the bar for science education. Moving the focus of instruction away from memorization and toward active engagement and critical thinking, the standards aim to teach students to think like scientists and engineers and grapple with core scientific principles, in addition to supporting deep learning of concepts that cut across science domains. Amplify Science has been designed from the ground up to meet the Next Generation Science Standards and respond to the instructional shifts called for by the National Research Council’s Framework for K-12 science education (2012).

Amplify Science’s instructional model allows students to access their prior knowledge and to connect past learning experiences to the present. Students have the opportunity to ask questions and define problems about the natural and designed world, design investigations in which they collect and analyze trends and patterns in their data, engage in argument form evidence in both writing and through discourse with their peers, develop conceptual scientific models of physical phenomena, and to communicate their findings from their investigations.

Science Curriculum

The newly adoption Seattle Public Schools K-5 science curriculum is Amplify Science. It is the product of a collaboration between the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science and the instructional technologists at Amplify, with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the National Science Foundation.

Since their release in 2013, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have raised the bar for science education. Moving the focus of instruction away from memorization and toward active engagement and critical thinking, the standards aim to teach students to think like scientists and engineers and grapple with core scientific principles, in addition to supporting deep learning of concepts that cut across science domains. Amplify Science has been designed from the ground up to meet the Next Generation Science Standards and respond to the instructional shifts called for by the National Research Council’s Framework for K-12 science education (2012).

Amplify Science Instructional Model

Amplify Science’s instructional model allows students to access their prior knowledge and to connect past learning experiences to the present. Students have the opportunity to ask questions and define problems about the natural and designed world, design investigations in which they collect and analyze trends and patterns in their data, engage in argument form evidence in both writing and through discourse with their peers, develop conceptual scientific models of physical phenomena, and to communicate their findings from their investigations.

Learn More about the Amplify Science K-8 Curriculum

Assessment

The Amplify Science curriculum was constructed to develop deep science knowledge and understanding, not merely touching on each science standard, but allowing for a depth of coverage in a variety of learning style for each. The program’s system of assessments provides an innovative means of supporting all students in developing this deep understanding. By aligning instruction to focused, meaningful, and standards-based learning goals every student is achieving the level of understanding required by each unit.

Assessment opportunities include:

  • Pre-Unit Assessment: Drawn and written responses (K–5). We want to know what understanding students are bringing to the classroom.
  • On-the-Fly Assessments: Are designed to help a teacher make sense of student activity during a learning experience (e.g., student-to-student talk, writing, model construction) and to provide evidence of how a student is coming to understand core concepts and developing their use of the other dimensions in our state standards.
  • End-of-chapter assessments: Variety of tasks, intended to assess student progress, occurring at the end of each chapter. Examples include written scientific explanations, argumentation, developing and using models, and designing engineering solutions.
  • Student Self-Assessments: One per chapter; brief opportunities for students to reflect on their own learning, ask questions, and reveal ongoing thoughts about unit content.
  • Critical Juncture Assessment: Occurring toward the end of each chapter (K–5), these help teachers to ensure all students are ready before moving on to a new phase of instruction.
  • End-of-Unit Assessment: Targeted conversations (K–1), written responses (grades 2–5). These assessments for each unit are designed to provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of students’ progress and attainment of three-dimensional learning.
  • Investigation Assessments: Embedded in one unit at each grade level, these summative assessments provide students with an open-ended opportunity to show what they’ve learned by planning and conducting their own scientific investigation of a scientific phenomenon. Across K-5, these assessments occur in the units: Sunlight and Weather(Kindergarten); Light and Sound (Grade 1); Plant and Animal Relationships (Grade 2); Balancing Forces (Grade 3); Vision and Light (Grade 4); and Patterns of Earth and Sky (Grade 5).

Social Studies skills are used to build new understanding and utilize background knowledge to construct meaning and share complex ideas in these four areas.

Connecting to Since Time Immemorial (STI)

The state-developed and SPS-approved Since Time Immemorial curriculum is a crucial part of social studies education in Seattle Public Schools (SPS) and Washington state.

State law mandates the teaching of local tribal history in Washington’s K–12 classrooms. Moreover, the Since Time Immemorial curriculum takes an integrated approach so that teachers can teach this content within social studies units aligned to state standards and, where appropriate, build toward successful completion of OSPI-developed classroom-based assessments (CBAs).

Social Studies Curriculum

Students at Coe learn about the world in the contexts of History, Economics, Geography, and Civics. Social Studies skills are used to build new understanding and utilize background knowledge to construct meaning and share complex ideas in these four areas.

Connecting to Since Time Immemorial (STI)

The state-developed and SPS-approved Since Time Immemorial curriculum is a crucial part of social studies education in Seattle Public Schools (SPS) and Washington state.

State law mandates the teaching of local tribal history in Washington’s K–12 classrooms. Moreover, the Since Time Immemorial curriculum takes an integrated approach so that teachers can teach this content within social studies units aligned to state standards and, where appropriate, build toward successful completion of OSPI-developed classroom-based assessments (CBAs).

Since Time Immemorial Resources

SPS has a wealth of resources and guidance on STI on the “American Indian Studies” webpage.

In addition, to get guidance on specific curricular resources, instructional materials, and books, please visit to the SPS Native American Education Library.

Finally, to view the state-developed resources on STI, please visit the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) Since Time Immemorial webpage

Coe’s Visual Arts program

Encourages artistic and aesthetic growth through exploration and observation

  • Promotes in creativity and originality
  • Uses a variety of art media to express and communicate
  • Uses the creative process to solve problems
  • Supports understanding and use of art elements, concepts, and vocabulary
  • Responds, interprets, and reflects on artistic works
  • Appreciates the enjoyment of the artistic process
  • Explores the world of art history and cultural art
  • Relates artistic ideas and work with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding

The art room is located on the 3rd floor East.

In addition to the classroom curriculum, Coe also offers various enrichment opportunities in visual arts.

Coe hosts the Northwest Art Project. This opportunity brings original works of art, on loan from Junior League of Seattle, to our students, giving them the amazing opportunity to get up close and interact with works of art.

Coe is dedicated to providing consistent and comprehensive arts education to all students. The Creative Advantage is a Seattle Public Schools arts plan that establishes partnerships with local artists to enrich student learning. We are finding opportunities to bring artists in residence to work with students to enhance engagement by integrating arts with other core content in their classrooms.

The visual arts teacher also offers a rotating schedule of after-school art programs for students focusing on painting, drawing, clay, sculpture, and more.

Mission and Vision

The mission of Visual & Performing Arts is to ensure equitable access to a comprehensive, sequential, and predictable arts education for each and every student in Seattle Public Schools.

We envision a wholistic approach to learning where students can explore, take risks, make mistakes, be themselves, and find community.

Arts Goals

Every student in every school receives:

  • High quality arts learning that teaches sequential arts skills and techniques, develops students’ 21st century skills and is culturally responsive
  • Instruction from certified arts teachers
  • Arts integration
  • Arts partnerships with community-based organizations and teaching artists
  • Opportunities to connect arts to careers

Why the Arts Matter

Research shows that students who have an arts education are more successful in school and life. Students in the arts:

  • are more motivated and engaged,
  • have better attendance,
  • have lower discipline rates,
  • do better academically,
  • are more likely to graduate, and
  • are more civically engaged as adults.

Social Emotional Learning

Coe Elementary utilizes the RULER program to support the social emotional development of students and to create a welcoming learning environment for all students.

The RULER Approach

RULER is an approach to social emotional learning (SEL) that teaches emotional intelligence to people of all ages, with the goal of creating a healthier, more equitable, innovative, and compassionate society.

The Anchors of Emotional Intelligence

The RULER Anchor Tools build the emotional intelligence of school leaders, teachers and staff, and students and their families. The four RULER Anchor Tools are: 

1. Charter

The Charter is an agreement guided by two questions: 

  • How do you want to feel when we’re together? 
  • How will we help each other have these feelings? 

2. Mood Meter

The Mood Meter is a tool that helps us understand our emotions. It’s made up of four different quadrants.

  • Blue like sad or lonely
  • Red like anger or fear 
  • Yellow like joy or excitement 
  • Green like included and calm

3. Meta-Moment

The Meta-Moment is a pause between the moment something happens and our response. Its our steps are: 

  • Sense: Noticing body, thoughts, feelings like sweaty palms and a racing mind 
  • Pause: Taking a deep breath
  • See Your Best Self: Remembering the person you want to be
  • Strategize & Act: Use an action or thought strategy. For example taking a walk, getting a drink of water, remembering there is more than one way to look at a situation.

4. Blueprint

The Blueprint is a set of questions for resolving conflicts: 

  • What happened? 
  • How did I feel? 
  • What caused my feelings? 
  • How did I express and regulate my emotions? 
  • How might my actions have affected others? 
  • Next time how might I respond differently? 

Visit the SPS RULER website to learn more.

Positive Behavior Approach

At Coe, we believe that each student has a responsibility to help school be a pleasant, safe, inclusive, and caring place to learn and play. We expect each child to exhibit appropriate behavior in all areas of the school so teachers can teach, and children can learn and feel safe. School and classroom expectations and student responsibilities will be taught, modeled, and reinforced throughout the year and staff will provide differentiated support to students in modeling these expectations and responsibilities. We match high expectations for students with a high level of warmth and support.  

Coe Schoolwide Positive Behavior Expectations:  

Be Safe 

Be Kind 

Be Coe (respectful and responsible) 

Through Coe’s Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports framework staff teach, model, reinforce, and frequently review these expectations in areas such as classrooms, playground, lunchroom, hallway, and restrooms. These expectations are also posted clearly in the building for students, staff, and visitors to reference. Students are recognized for modeling positive behavior through a school-wide system called Positive Paws. We encourage you to review Coe behavior expectations with your child.  

What happens if a student engages in misbehavior?  

The foundation of Seattle Public Schools’ discipline policy is one of prevention, by establishing a safe and welcoming environment that includes shared behavioral expectations and a common language for talking about expected behavior that is inclusive of students, families, teachers, administrators, volunteers, and other staff. Discipline procedures and strategies aim to maximize instructional time and reduce out of school consequences for behavior. 

Typically, the Coe staff member supervising students will address the misbehavior and support conflict resolution, but if the behavior continues to occur or is serious in nature, the issue will be referred to the principal or assistant principal. Specific behavior that will be sent to the principal or assistant principal includes but is not limited to physical aggression; failure to follow the directions of a staff member; and verbal aggression. 

The principal/assistant principal will utilize Seattle Public Schools policy and procedures when determining consequences for misconduct. Parents will always be contacted via email or phone if a student is referred to the principal or assistant principal for behavior.  

Learn more about Student Rights and Responsibilities and Discipline.